quincycompressor

One of the main missions of an organization is to improve customer satisfaction and retention through better customer service. Speaker, Tim Connor shared Twelve Laws of Effective Customer Service on his website www.timconnor.com. Read the twelve “laws” below and think about following them within your own organization….

Law #1: The customer is not always right. However, the goal is not to discredit, embarrass belittle or challenge them in a destructive way. What we need to do, is discover what is the source or cause of their incorrect perceptions, beliefs or attitudes. The next step is to determine if the organization has contributed significantly to these incorrect feelings or if their source is the competition, the marketplace or Uncle Harry.

Law #2: The customer is never always completely wrong. There is always some element of their perception that is a true reflection of reality as they see it. The customer can be a teacher for us if we will keep an open mind and receptive neutral demeanor. They can mirror back to us where our advertising, distribution methods, pricing strategies, administrative policies or marketing or sales methods need improvement, refinement or a major overhaul.

Law #3: The customer deserves your best regardless of the time or day of the week or the month of the year. Working late last night because it was your monthly inventory or your annual sales blowout should not become my problem.

Law #4: The customer deserves your best regardless of YOUR training, length of service, inventory philosophy or any other prevailing corporate attitude. So you are on the first week of the job and still can’t master this new piece of equipment or you are overstocked on a particular item so you cut back on stocking the items that I use regularly and ask me if I will accept a substitute. These and thousands of illustrations like them, if they become my problem, will cause me to seek out your competitor.

Law #5: Don’t pass the buck. Whoever hears a problem owns the problem. How often have you been transferred several times before you finally get to the right person? Have you ever heard, “it’s not my job, problem or function.” Don’t get defensive or upset when I bring you a concern or complaint. Accept the fact that the problem exists and help me get it solved.

Law #6: Don’t be too busy for your customers and don’t make it difficult for them to do business with you. How many times have you gotten the feeling that you are an interruption in an employees day or workload. Have you ever been made to feel like you shouldn’t be having a problem with a product or service, that it is your fault that the item broke?

Law #7: Employees are customers too. Every employee that ever does anything within an organization ultimately is doing it indirectly for the customer. That makes every employee an ambassador, spokesperson or representative of the customer.

Law #8: If you use technology, make it user friendly. Within the past week I have had five voice mail systems hang up on me. When I called back to get a person I had to spend se veral minutes of my valuable time wading through endless recorder dribble. I finally called another supplier.

Law #9: Say what you do and do what you say. Follow through, keep your promises, honor your commitments, keep the customer informed of your progress. Customers will tend to be more understanding, patient and tolerant if you communicate with them with integrity and in a timely manner.

Law #10: Be interested, care and act like you are glad I am doing business with you. People like doing business with people who appreciate their business. People are willing to give more of their business and money to businesses that are friendly, accommodating and interesting.

Law #11: Keep private things private. I am not interested in your personal problems or corporate politics. Sharing private, confidential or personal information whether you are the CEO or receptionist is in poor taste and unprofessional.

Law #12: Think ahead of the customer with a problem solving attitude. To survive and prosper in the balance of this decade and century as well in the new century will require that organizations and their employees, all of them, think well ahead of their customers and their potential future desires, problems and needs. Waiting for the customer to bring their problems to you or to communicate their future desires or needs with you will be too late.

Commonly used words in the compressed air world

  • Compressor – machines designed from compressing air or gas from an initial intake pressure to a higher discharge pressure
  • Vacuum Pumps – machines for compressing air or gas from an initial pressure which is below atmospheric to a final pressure which is near atmospheric
  • Intercoolers – devices for removing the heat of compression of the air or gas between consecutive stages of multistage compressors
  • Aftercoolers – devices for removing the heat of compression of the air or gas after compression is completed. They are one of the most effective means of removing moisture from compressed air
  • Load Factor – ratio of the average compressor output during period of actual use to the continuous rated output of the machine
  • Absolute Pressure – gauge pressure plus atmospheric pressure.  At sea level the gauge pressure in pounds per square inch (psi) plus 14.7 gives the absolute pressure in pounds per square inch (psia)
  • Low Pressure – Orifice Test is a method of accurately measuring the air delivered by a compressor. It is in the method recognized by ASME, ANSI (International Standards).
  • Unload (No Load) – Air compressor continues to run (usually at FULL RPM), but NO air is delivered because intake is either  “closed off” or “modified”, NOT allowing inlet air to be trapped
  • “Modulating” Unload – air compressor continues to run and air supply is matched to demand by  “partial unloading”. This is usually accomplished by a “regulator controlled floating inlet”.
  • Start-Stop Control: Air supply is matched to demand by actual starting and stopping of the unit
  • Cut-in/Cut-off Pressure – The settings on a pressure switch used to either “load or unload” the air compressor on “constant speed” application. The “cut-out” pressure is also referred to as “maximum pressure”, the point at which there is NO AIR DELIVERED. The “cut-in” pressure is also referred as “minimum pressure” – the pressure that the system is allowed to fall to before additional air volume is called for. The compressor runs at full load between cut-in and cut-out.
  • Variable Displacement Controls: Also called “Rotor Length Adjustment” in oil cooled Rotary Screw controls. Particularly efficient in holding constant speed from 60% to 100% capacity variable speed control. Below this usually goes to “blow down” and idle.
  • Rated Pressure: The operating pressure at which the air compressor’s performance (CFM and BHP – Horsepower required) is measured
  • Specific Power: Used to compare air compressor efficiency unless otherwise stated. Usually in form of BHP/100 ACFM or CFM/HP
  1. Determine the type of compressor needed based on your PSI needs
  2. Determine air consumption: List all equipment and tool requirements, both continuous and intermittent air
  3. Add together the cfm requirements of all the equipment/tools you plan to run at the same time. Increase this number by 20% to allow for additional tools, future growth and eventual air leaks. Determine the maximum pressure (PSIG) needed to run the equipment. Simply use the value of the equipment that requires the greatest amount of pressure. If above total = less than 100 CFM divide this total by four to find HP. If total is over 100 CFM divide by five.
    1. Example: System requires 310 CFM at 100 PSIG
      310/5 = 62 HP
    2. 60 HP or 75 HP Compressor is needed

 

Visit quincycompressor.com to review the different types of compressors we offer.

 

 

Quincy Compressor donates an air compressor to the North Baldwin Center for Technology which will be used by students in the Building Construction and Welding Career Technology Education programs at North Baldwin Center for Technology.

The air compressor will be used by students in the Building Construction and Welding Career Technology programs at North Baldwin Center for Technology. Here, students and faculty members are joined by representatives of Quincy Compressor, Baldwin County Board of Education, City of Bay Minette and North Baldwin Chamber of Commerce.

Click here to read the full story.

To estimate power costs, you will need to know the following:

  1. What is the cost per KWH?
  2. How many hours per year does the compressor run?
  3. At what capacity will the compressor run or how many hours will the compressor run at various load levels?
  4. What are the brake horsepower requirements of the compressor at the required load levels?
  5. What is the motor efficiency?

It is important to use actual CFM requirements to figure the load level of the compressor.  Do not base power cost calculations on comments like, “About half the time we run at full load and about half the time we run at 70% of full load.” Full load for one machine may not be the same as full load for another machine. Always determine the exact air requirement in order to provide the customer with a power cost calculation that approximates his situation.

Motor efficiencies vary from horsepower to horsepower and from manufacturer to manufacturer within horsepower ranges. The only way to accurately figure power costs will be to use the motor efficiency number on the nameplate of the actual motor being used.

With the above information in hand, annual power costs can be estimated by using the following formulas:

  • kW=BHP x .746/motor efficiency

Example – Find the kW of a 100 HP, normal efficiency motor running at a 95 HP load.

  • kW = 95 x .746/.93 = 76.2
  • Cost per hour = KWH x power cost

Example – Find the cost per hour to operate the compressor in the above example assuming a cost per KWH of 7 cents.

  • Cost per hour = 76.2 x 0.07 = $5.334

To find the annual power costs, calculate the cost per hour of operating at the various anticipated load levels and multiply by the anticipated number of hours that the machine will operate at those load levels.

Myth:
Compressed air is not desirable source of power

Fact:
When properly applied, compressed air can be the best choice. It is a safe, clean source of power that is easy to use and maintain

Myth:
Compressed air is very expensive

Fact:
Like the other power sources (electric, battery and hydraulic), compressed air can be costly. Compressed air cost can be minimized through correct application, installation and maintenance.

Myth:
Compressed air is dirty

Fact:
This is generally not true. Poor system design or lack of basic maintenance can result in contaminated air at point of use

Myth:
More pressure is better

Fact:
Raising pressure system-wide will require more power on-line. Pressure problems are best solved at the point of use where they exist, not with more power in the compressor room

Myth:
Reducing compressor operating pressure will save energy

Fact:
How far pressure is reduced will determine the savings, the further it is reduced the less stable and reliable the system will become. The first time production is interrupted operating pressure will be returned to previous levels and savings will disappear

Myth:
Routine servicing is not required

Fact:
The longer you leave between compressor service intervals, the more likely it is that your compressor will break down. How long can you business run without compressed air? A dirty oil removal filter can increase your energy use by 2 percent and a clogged air/oil separator up to 5 percent

Air leaks are a significant source of wasted energy in a compressed air system, often wasting as much as 20-30% of the compressor’s output. Compressed air leaks can also contribute to problems with system operations, including:

  • Fluctuating system pressure, which can cause air tools and other air-operated equipment to function less efficiently, possibly affecting production
  • Excess compressor capacity, resulting in higher than necessary costs
  • Decreased service life and increased maintenance of supply equipment due to unnecessary cycling and increased run time

Proactive leak detection and repair can reduce leaks to less than 10% of compressor output. The most common leak problem areas are:

  • Couplings, hoses, tubes and fittings
  • Disconnects
  • Filters, regulators and lubricators
  • Open condensate traps
  • Pipe joints
  • Control and shut-off valves
  • Point of use devices
  • Flanges
  • Cylinder rod packing
  • Thread sealants

Once leaks have been repaired, the compressor control system should be re-evaluated to realize the total savings potential.  Quincy’s patented, Frost and Sullivan award-winning EQ process evaluates the overall efficiency of your compressed air system based on “Best Practices” solutions. Please visit quincycompressor.com for more information on our patented EQ process.

References: Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for the Industry, Motor Challenge and Compressed Air Challenge, April 1998.

Twelve Laws of Effective Customer Service

Posted on: August 6, 2014

One of the main missions of an organization is to improve customer satisfaction and retention through better customer service. Speaker, Tim Connor shared Twelve Laws of Effective Customer Service on his website www.timconnor.com. Read the twelve “laws” below and think about following them within your own organization…. Law #1: The customer is not always right. […]

Read More

Air Compressor Terminology 101

Posted on: May 28, 2014

Commonly used words in the compressed air world Compressor – machines designed from compressing air or gas from an initial intake pressure to a higher discharge pressure Vacuum Pumps – machines for compressing air or gas from an initial pressure which is below atmospheric to a final pressure which is near atmospheric Intercoolers – devices […]

Read More

Selecting an Air Compressor..

Posted on: May 28, 2014

Determine the type of compressor needed based on your PSI needs Determine air consumption: List all equipment and tool requirements, both continuous and intermittent air Add together the cfm requirements of all the equipment/tools you plan to run at the same time. Increase this number by 20% to allow for additional tools, future growth and […]

Read More

Quincy Compressor donates an air compressor

Posted on: May 23, 2014

Quincy Compressor donates an air compressor to the North Baldwin Center for Technology which will be used by students in the Building Construction and Welding Career Technology Education programs at North Baldwin Center for Technology. The air compressor will be used by students in the Building Construction and Welding Career Technology programs at North Baldwin […]

Read More

How To Estimate Power Costs?

Posted on: April 10, 2014

To estimate power costs, you will need to know the following: What is the cost per KWH? How many hours per year does the compressor run? At what capacity will the compressor run or how many hours will the compressor run at various load levels? What are the brake horsepower requirements of the compressor at […]

Read More

Compressed Air Myths

Posted on: April 10, 2014

Myth: Compressed air is not desirable source of power Fact: When properly applied, compressed air can be the best choice. It is a safe, clean source of power that is easy to use and maintain Myth: Compressed air is very expensive Fact: Like the other power sources (electric, battery and hydraulic), compressed air can be […]

Read More

Common Air Compressor Leak Problem Areas

Posted on: April 10, 2014

Air leaks are a significant source of wasted energy in a compressed air system, often wasting as much as 20-30% of the compressor’s output. Compressed air leaks can also contribute to problems with system operations, including: Fluctuating system pressure, which can cause air tools and other air-operated equipment to function less efficiently, possibly affecting production […]

Read More