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Air compressors are versatile energy solutions that form the backbone of many industries. With the proper care, you can keep your air compressor running smoothly for years to come. Overall, the biggest threats to air compressors are water and rust. Over time, a rusting tank can become over-pressured and dangerous. At Quincy Compressor, we’re here to teach you why rust forms on your air compressor as well as how to clean it to keep your workers safe.

Why Rust Forms on Your Air Compressor

At the beginning of an air compressor’s product life cycle, the machine has little to no water inside of it. However, as you begin using your air compressor more often, the chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen produces water that interacts with the iron inside your air tank. The longer you’ve been running your air compressor, the more water it probably contains. A majority of this condensation leaves the tank through the nozzle, but around 10% tends to condense and turn into liquid in the tank.

Your tank may look spotless and healthy on the outside, but as long as there is water inside the tank, the tank’s integrity may be compromised. Rust is a highly corrosive chemical reaction byproduct that eats away at the integrity of your tank and causes small punctures that allow air to escape. Once the integrity of your tank has been compromised, it must be replaced to ensure workplace safety.

If you have noticed excessive condensation in your tank, you should replace your rusting air compressor. You cannot remove rust from an air compressor, and sanding away rust damages the integrity of the tank and increases the risk of danger.

How to Prevent Rust in an Air Compressor Tank

Since rust causes irreversible damage to air tanks, prevention is the best way to keep your tank healthy and yourself safe. The most effective way to prevent rust in your air tanks is to drain each tank regularly after every operation. This process helps eliminate the condensation that’s pooled at the bottom of the tank. After draining, leaving the valve open for a couple of hours will allow the inside of the tank to dry out.

Another way to help prevent rust is with the addition of an aftercooler. Aftercoolers attach to your air tank to stop water vapor before it enters the tank. An aftercooler acts as a filter that gathers warm air and cools it down. This technique prevents moisture from occurring in the first place and helps eliminate the heat that detrimentally affects equipment sealing and lubrication. For optimal effect, your aftercooler should be attached as closely as possible to the discharge of the compressor.

No matter what equipment you use to keep your air compressor rust-free and safe, always make sure to keep routinely checking the vessel for water and rust. Even if you have an aftercooler, you should still check the tank for vessel integrity to uphold the highest safety standards possible.

Reduce Rust With Quincy Air Compressors

Quincy Compressor is one of the world’s leading producers of air compressors. We pride ourselves on creating products that have the most reliability and cost-effectiveness in their field. To learn more about our air compressors, contact us today.

Food and beverage operations make up a high-risk industry, and air compressors are valuable tools throughout processing and packaging. With the need for efficiency, consistency and cleanliness, compressed air meets every requirement. Learn about air compressors for beverage packaging and how food packaging plants can remain contaminant-free.

Compressed Air in Food Facilities

Compressed air is a versatile tool in the food industry, particularly in packaging. Many food facilities need to package high volumes of food in a given day, and compressed air systems offer the efficiency these operations need for their product lines. Typical applications for compressed air in food packaging plants include:

  • Vacuum sealing.
  • Air-cleaning packaging.
  • Generating nitrogen for food preservation.
  • Sanitizing packaging machines.
  • Blow molding for packaging containers.
  • Operating diaphragm pumps for liquid distribution.
  • Cold compressing frozen products.

Facilities regulate air compressors into packaging lines because they deliver consistent, repeatable results. For example, air compressors for vacuum sealing ensure every product will stay fresh, and all packages will look the same on the shelf. Beyond consistency, air compressors can meet sanitary requirements in food processing and packaging.

Contamination and Contact System Types

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate 48 million people get sick every year from foodborne illnesses. Preventing contamination is critical to consumer safety, and many food facilities prefer air compressors because they can meet a high cleanliness standard.

Without proper care and preventative measures, air compressor systems may contain microorganisms, oil vapors and aerosols, dirt, dust and spores. Air compressors are separated into three categories to determine the best configurations and care measures for food safety.

Contact

When air compressors come into direct contact with food items, manufacturers take extreme measures to prevent contamination. Examples of a contact air compressor are air knives used to chop produce or jet nozzles for peeling vegetables.

In these instances, preventing contaminants is critical. Manufacturers will avoid oil-based systems to prevent contaminating aerosols. Carbon filters remove any excess oil vapors, and desiccant dryers reduce moisture where microorganisms can grow.

Non-Contact High Risk

In these compressed air systems, there is no direct contact with food, but there may be indirect contact. An example of this category is compressed air used to mold packaging. The air doesn’t touch the food, but the packaging will later on in the production line. These systems use similar measures as contact systems to prevent potential contamination.

Non-Contact Low Risk

In cases where the air compressor makes no direct or indirect contact, the system is low risk. These systems are often called plant air systems, and they go toward the general function of the plant, like cleaning non-food-related machinery. Typically, these systems are oil-free to reduce vapors, and they’re designed to have a specific dew point setting that will prevent excess moisture where microorganisms can grow.

At Quincy Compressor, we understand the demands of the food industry, and we give you the guidance you need for choosing air compressors for beverage packaging. From atmospheric contamination and storage to compressor types, we set you up with the best unit for your operation.

Contact Quincy Compressor for Compressed Air in Food Facilities

For over a century, Quincy Compressor has offered reliable air compressors with premium performance for a range of applications. Our 24-hour service support, industry-leading warranty protection and high-quality engineering mean you can count on us for your air compressor needs.

When you need air compressors for food and beverage packaging, we’ll ensure your system is consistent and safe. Get a quote for your air compressor or contact us today.

Air compressor fittings are essential to keeping your unit running efficiently and delivering the air power you require for your operations. Knowing the types of air compressor fittings available is essential to choosing the right components for your specific model, so the experts at Quincy Compressor compiled this guide to help you determine the sizes and styles you need.

With Quincy Compressor, you can keep your air compressor running smoothly.

What Are Air Compressor Fittings?

Air compressor fittings are attachments that maintain a consistent flow of air and pressure throughout the compressor. Each fitting has a different role, but they are all crucial to managing your unit’s health and functionality.

When it’s time to replace the fittings on your air compressor, you want to start by checking the size you need. Most air compressor fitting sizes follow the National Pipe Tapered (NPT) standard, which denotes the thread size. Using an NPT chart, you should measure and determine the size of your pipes for a fitting. With that information, you can source the various air compressor fittings you may need.

Couplers

Couplers facilitate the connection of an air tank or air compressor to the air lines. When the air hose is disconnected, the coupler closes to prevent air from escaping. Couplers come in a range of styles, including automotive, industrial, ARO and V-style.

There are two main types of couplers — automatic and manual. Automatic fittings allow you to plug your air lines in directly. They also quickly seal the air opening when the hose or male part is removed, allowing the O-ring or female connection to close completely. Manual couplers require you to pull on the collar of the coupler to insert and remove the air hose. When you remove the line, hold it tightly — the coupler will abruptly expel the tool as compressed air escapes.

Plugs

Couplers and plugs go together. Whichever style you choose for your coupler, you need the same style for the plug. The essential piece of information you need to decide on a plug is the flow size, or the volume of air the plug can manage. Most standard air compressors require a plug with a 1/2-inch or 1/4-inch flow size, with the latter being more common.

Just like couplers, plugs come in automotive, industrial, ARO and V-style designs. The style of fitting you choose comes down to personal preference, although automotive and industrial variants are more common and easier to find at chain hardware stores. Quality and fit are the most important factors when buying an air compressor plug, so opt for a brand with known quality to prevent compressed air leaks.

Connectors

Because there are so many different compressed air fitting types, manufacturers have come to recognize how difficult it can be to find the one you need. That’s why companies have begun to color-coordinate their couplers and plugs. For example, you may find a company that matches colors with the following classes:

  • Red for Automotive
  • Green for Industrial
  • Blue for ARO
  • Yellow for V-style

Contact Quincy Compressor With Questions

Choosing the right fittings can be just as important as selecting an air compressor. This quick guide to air compressor fittings should get you started, but if you need further assistance, the team at Quincy Compressor is here to help. Our air experts can answer your questions and help you find the equipment you need to keep your air compressor at its best.

Browse our products today and contact us with any questions!

Compressors of all sizes produce noise and often get quite loud. If the sound is an unusual one, however, it could be practically deafening. Air compressor humming is common at startup but could also happen during use. If that happens, you can also experience a sudden drop in tank pressure. We’ll let you know what air compressor humming means, why it’s happening and what you can do about it.

Common Reasons Why Your Air Compressor Is Humming

Air compressor humming is a sign of trouble. With equipment, humming usually signals an issue with electricity. With a little troubleshooting, you can get to the bottom of the hum from an air compressor. In many cases, you can even resolve your issue on the spot.

Not Enough Power

Compressors are highly mobile, and you can take them anywhere you need to as long as you have access to power. If you need to work away from your power supply, make sure you have an extension cord rated to handle the job. Extension cords come in gauges. The lower yours is, the better suited the cord is for heavy-duty and outdoor applications. Wires with higher gauges (typically 14 and above) can cause power draws that make your air compressor hum.

A Malfunctioning Unloader Valve

Unloader valves release excess pressure from the tank. If your unloader valve traps air inside your compressor, the stress will interfere with the motor. If the motor is unable to start because of excessive air buildup, the air compressor will hum. To troubleshoot yours, power your compressor down. Using the hose, empty the tank to relieve pressure. Turn the compressor on. If it works, your unloader valve is to blame.

Clogged Intake Filters

Air compressor intake filters prevent dirt and crud from getting into your machine. Over time, the trapped media builds up, restricting airflow into the motor. Without enough air, compressors will stall, and yours may hum when you try to restart it. To check and see if your air filter is the cause of your air compressor humming, unscrew and remove it, then restart your machine. If it works, you need to clean your filter.

A Blocked Tank Check Valve

Blocked valves stop the air inside your tank or compressor header from coming back through the inlet line after shutdown. If the valve gets stuck open, it can cause damage. If it gets held closed, it can cause a pressure increase that often leads to air compressor humming.

Tank check valves typically attach to the tank where the pump-head line connects. Remove yours and clean any debris from the valve. If it remains stuck, you need a replacement.

Faulty Capacitors

Compressors require a lot of power. Inside these machines are capacitors that provide the additional energy needed to kick your compressor into gear. These devices act like batteries and store electricity.

Like batteries, they will eventually reach the end of their useful life. They can also have their function reduced much more quickly if they take damage from a voltage spike, corrosion or high temperatures. In this case, your best bet is to call a professional repair company or replace your compressor.

Want to Talk About Air Compressors?

We do! If your air compressor is humming and you’re tired of chasing down fixes, upgrade to one of our latest models. To learn more about the compressors we offer, send us a message today.

If you’re in the market for a new air compressor, you know there is a lot that goes into that decision. You have to think about your usage, tools, power availability, pressure demands, airflow needs and system controls. Then, there are additional features that can improve the results of your air compressor that you’ll need to consider. And if you’re buying used? There are even more decisions to make and questions to ask regarding its previous use.

Thankfully, we know air compressors inside and out and specialize in finding the right one for your needs. As you work through the purchasing process, there are some questions you can ask to help you buy a new or used air compressor.

What I Need to Know Before Buying a Compressor: Questions to Ask Yourself

Asking yourself several questions before selecting an air compressor will help you choose the tool that best meets your needs. It helps to have an understanding of how you’ll use the air compressor, when you’ll use it and where you’ll use it. Some questions to ask yourself include:

1. What is the Application?

You need to know what you’re going to be using the air compressor for because the use influences the type of compressor you’ll need.

 

what is the application

For instance, the pharmaceutical or food processing industries have stricter application requirements than other industries. If your company is in the pharmaceutical or food industry, you may want to consider an oil-free air compressor, which minimizes the risk of any oil coming in contact with the air itself.  When you use compressed air to remove shells from nuts or mix dry products, the food comes into direct contact with the air. Direct contact means that the air must be free of particulate contaminants and should have a low dew point, to prevent microbial growth.

 

Understanding air quality needs is a major component of selecting an air compressor. Identifying proper application use will also help you determine things like the duty cycle you need, the compressor design, power requirements and more.

2. What Air Tools Will You Be Using?

What air tools will you be using

The tools that you plan to use with your air compressor each have a rating in cubic feet per minute (CFM). The rating tells you how much air the tool will use, and for multiple tools, you’ll need to add the ratings together. Another reason to consider your equipment is that some air compressor designs work better for different tasks than others. Tools that you use continuously, like sanders and grinders, can benefit more from a compressor that offers a constant flow, like a rotary screw compressor.

3. How Often Will You Use the Air Compressor?

How often will you use the air compressor

Frequency of use is a major consideration when you’re purchasing a new compressor. The demands on a compressor working six to seven hours a day, five days a week, are much different than the demands on a compressor that is only used every once in a while. Try to get an idea of how often you’ll have the compressor running. You’ll also want to consider how frequently it will be turned on and off. Intermittent power puts different demands on the system than continuous use.

Knowing your usage can help you determine what duty cycle your compressor needs. The duty cycle determines how long a compressor can run at a time. If it has an 80% duty cycle, it shouldn’t be run for more than eight minutes for every 10-minute period. Industrial compressors can have a duty cycle of up to 100%, so they can run continuously, while hobby compressors may have around 50%. A higher duty cycle can offer better efficiency over higher-horsepower models, depending on the application.

4. Where Will You Store and Use the Compressor?

Location plays a significant role in the operation of your compressor and can affect air quality, maintenance factors and the office environment. If the compressor is outdoors, you’ll need to protect it from rain, heat, sunlight and other elements. Many compressors are built for this purpose and manufactured accordingly.

Where will you store and use your compressor

Ventilation is a primary concern when an air compressor is indoors. Small, enclosed spaces like closets can impede operation and generate a lot of heat. Most compressors are air-cooled, so be sure that the heat emissions from the compressor do not recirculate to the space where cooling air should be. Placing a compressor too close to the wall can also create excessive heat — aim to put it at least three feet away. The right compressor size and style can help you fit it in a good location.

Single, muti-stage and rotary screw air compressors are all stationary and designed for use in one location, while portable air compressors can provide more flexibility, as you can move them around and to your work station. You’ll still need to keep a portable air compressor well-ventilated and attach it to an appropriate power source. It is typically a good choice for one-person operations.

5. What Type of Power is Available?

What type of power is available

Check what kind of voltage and electricity connections you have available. It may be a good idea to have an experienced electrician review your space before you buy a compressor. In a residential setting, you may only have enough voltage to power smaller, single-stage machines. Industrial environments will offer more power, but you’ll still need to know your capabilities and ensure that the device you want can match those numbers. Horsepower is generally a good indicator of how much power a machine needs, but CFM and pounds per square inch (PSI) are perhaps more useful for your calculations.

If you do not have access to electrical power, you are more limited in your choice of tool,  as extension cords and generators aren’t recommended for use with an air compressor. The extension cords aren’t effective at providing appropriate power to the machine, although longer hoses can help you reach your work area better. Generators may cause fluctuations in power that can be damaging to an air compressor. A gas compressor might be a better choice if electrical power isn’t handy.

6. How Much Pressure Do You Need?

You need to know the pressure demands on your air compressor. Check manufacturer specifications to determine the PSI that your tools need and consider if they will be running concurrently. If your demand is high, a two-stage compressor might more effectively reach the PSI requirements due to its higher capacity. When choosing a machine, think about the PSI required by your highest-demand tool. If your highest-rated tool requires 80 PSI, your compressor must have a minimum of an 80 PSI rating. Remember that pressure losses can occur in your air lines and piping, especially with devices like air dryers and filters, so factor that into your calculations as well.

7. How Much Airflow Do You Need?

If you’re wondering how much airflow you need, manufacturer specifications will tell you how much air each of your tools requires, usually in CFM or SCFM. SCFM stands for standard cubic feet per minute and accounts for different environmental factors that can change the performance of an air tool. Some machines will also offer an average CFM (ACFM), based on a 25% duty cycle. To find the continuous rating for the ACFM, multiply the number by four.

How much airflow do you need

Remember to add in all of the tools that are likely to be used at the same time. This compounding can significantly increase the demand placed on your compressor. Also, consider buying a machine with a little extra CFM capability if you’ll be expanding in the future or want more flexibility for heavy use times. We typically recommend a machine that offers CFMs about 30-50% higher than the requirements from your highest-rated tool.

8. What Size and Type of Air Tank Do You Need?

Air compressor tanks measure in gallons and can affect how some tools operate. Continuous-air tools such as sanders and grinders demand larger tanks than intermittent-use tools like staplers and nail guns. Bigger tanks are often better, due to less motor strain and condensation. A motor kicks on and fills up a tank with compressed air. The more it needs to turn on and off to fill the tank, the faster it will burn out, which shortens the life of your compressor. A larger tank reduces the strain on the motor by minimizing the number of starts it takes to keep the tank full.

As for the topic of moisture, air must be cooled after it is compressed. Immediately after compression, it is hot and holds onto moisture. A smaller air tank increases the likelihood of using the air before it has the chance to cool down. When warm air goes through the air lines, it can cause a buildup of condensation, which may damage the tools and the compressor itself. A large tank can help reduce these issues, and so can additional devices like aftercoolers, which cool the air before it flows through the line.

Using a vertical or horizontal air tank is generally based on personal preference and the location in which you’ll be putting the compressor.

 

9. What Compressor Features Might You Want to Consider?

What compressor features might you want to consider

Many facilities use additional equipment or opt for features in their compressors to meet specific needs.

  • Air dryer: To address the problem of moisture in the air lines, several different types of air dryers exist to remove that moisture and reduce the dew point of the air. Some applications and sanitary work processes benefit from this kind of machine.
  • Filters: The right filter system will remove moisture and particles from the air and can help you ensure a clean product. Oil and water separators can also help keep your lines clear.
  • Belt drive or direct drive: In rotary screw air compressors, you can find belt-driven or direct-driven options. In a direct drive model, the motor connects to the crankshaft of the compressor. It can work at lower temperatures with high efficiencies but can be more costly, challenging to maintain and noisy. Belt-drive compressors use a belt and pulleys to connect the motor and the pump, With these models, you can adjust airflow and pressure more easily. While they may not work well in extreme temperatures or harsh environments, they are less expensive and easier to maintain.
  • Cast-iron components: Cast iron crankcases, flywheels, valve seats and crankshafts can increase the durability of your compressor.
  • ASME parts: Components that meet the standards and codes of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers may offer better performance and safety features.
  • Low-oil protection: This feature enables a compressor to shut down if oil levels get too low, preventing downtime and expensive repairs from the effects of low fluid levels.
  • Ball-valve tank drain: With this feature, you can drain the tank frequently and easily to remove any moisture.

Some of these options can be game-changers, so speak with an expert at Quincy Compressors for help finding the best features to use with your compressor.

 

10. What System Controls Do You Need?

System controls can modify a variety of factors in a compressor, like speed and discharge pressure, to best fit your application. They include:

  • Start/stop: The simplest and most straightforward of controls, the start/stop controls turn the motor on or off depending on the discharge pressure. They work with reciprocating piston or rotary screw compressors.
  • Load/unload: Also called constant speed control, this scheme keeps the motor running and unloads the compressor when it reaches a specific level of discharge pressure.
  • Modulating: This type of control throttles the compressor output to reach flow requirements. It closes the inlet valve and is not very effective on displacement compressors. It is better for centrifugal and rotary screw compressors.
  • Multi-step controls: Partially-loaded states allow you to control output pressure without starting and stopping or loading and unloading the compressor. A three-step compressor has options at 0%, 50% and 100% while a five-step compressor has controls at 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%.

If you’re wondering about the differences between these different types of compressors, check out our guide to how air compressors work.

What You Need to Know Before Buying a Compressor: Questions to Ask the Air Compressor Dealer

Buying a used air compressor can help you significantly save on costs without sacrificing quality. Buying a new air compressor offers a certain degree of convenience and confidence in the buying process because you know that it has not been incorrectly used or worn out after years of use. Part of the process of buying an air compressor is asking the dealer questions to learn more about the history of the equipment.

Questions to ask the air compressor dealer

1. How Old is it?

You don’t want an air compressor that has been in use for too long, as technology has changed and improved since it was manufactured. While a used compressor can provide benefits in terms of cost, it is essential to consider how it differs from modern designs. Energy-saving designs might have been introduced that will offset the additional cost through reduced electricity bills. Or, you can use tools more efficiently to increase your productivity. Age can also affect how much stress the motor has been through, deterioration on components and other factors that may influence its performance.

Do your research on the machine itself. Some brands make compressors that last longer than others and are rated for more prolonged use. While one brand may still work perfectly after 10 years, another could struggle if it was made with cheap components or with a poor design.

2. Where Was it Used Before?

Some environments are going to break down a machine much faster than others. If an air compressor was built for indoor use but used outside, it was probably exposed to elements it was not intended to have contact with. These exposures could cause problems with it down the line.

Another consideration is compressors that are particularly delicate, or that may struggle in extreme temperatures. If you learn that a more fragile compressor was used in an uncooled facility in the Arizona desert or left in an unheated garage in the winter months up north, you may want to check out those delicate parts more thoroughly. Ensure that harsh temperatures did not harm the inner components.

3. How Was it Used Before?

In a similar vein, try to make sure the compressor was used appropriately and isn’t too worn. Like miles on a car, knowing the hours of operation can help you get a better idea of how worn the compressor could be. A compressor run for six hours a day every day will probably have more wear than one that was only run once a week for an hour.

If you understand the strain that it was put under, you may be clued into an issue such as the compressor being started and stopped more often than it should have been. This kind of activity can cause premature wear on the motor and spell trouble down the road.

4. What State Are the Filters, Tanks and Other Parts In?

This question ties into the previous one and can tell you more about how well it was maintained. Filters, tanks, exhaust and hoses should be clean and free of residue, dust or dirt. They should not be worn out or broken. If any of these issues are present, they may indicate poor maintenance practices that could spell risk in the future.

5. Can You Test it Out?

Like test driving a car, make sure that you can test out a compressor before purchasing it. Perform a thorough check on its functions and make sure all components are working properly. Testing out the equipment helps you minimize the chances of buying a compressor with a major flaw in it. You can also check that everything works according to the specifications that you need to reach.

Additional Buying Tips

There are some steps you can take to make buying an air compressor go smoothly. Aside from being prepared and identifying your unique needs, you can:

  • Discuss your purchase needs with a representative who can help you find the right tool for your operation: They are experts at matching up your requirements with the right machine and are knowledgeable about different equipment.
  • Consider the warranty you’re getting with the compressor: Some manufacturers or dealers will upcharge you for warranties, while others include warranties with your purchase and have extended coverage options. A warranty can save you money if an issue comes up with your compressor years after you’ve bought it.
  • Have a professional electrician come in to set up the machine: Check local codes to ensure everything is within regulations.
  • Understand your maintenance requirements: Ask the seller or manufacturer of the compressor for detailed information about oil and filter changes and regular cleaning procedures, to ensure your compressor lasts as long as possible and stays within warranty.
  • Think about the future: Will you want to expand your system of tools or could you end up increasing their demand? It may be worth it to explore options that surpass your current needs, to open up the possibilities in the future.

Ask the Experts

Ask the experts

Doing a bit of research before buying an air compressor helps you find one that fits your needs for air consumption, pressure requirements, location and more. The more you know about air compressors, the more likely you are to buy the right one, care for it property and maximize your return on investment.

Whether you know exactly what you need or still need some help figuring it out, the professional air experts at Quincy Compressor are ready to assist. Contact us today to learn more or find your local Quincy distributor.

Compressed air is an increasingly popular choice for casual paintball players and match play, and offers multiple advantages over carbon dioxide (CO2). As a power source, compressed air tanks are reliable solutions players can depend on during high-speed play any time of the year.

How Does a Paintball Gun Use an Air Compressor?

Paintball guns use tanks filled with compressed air to create pressure, cycling a paintball into the barrel and building pressure behind it. With each pull of the trigger, the pressure releases to propel the ball through the barrel, then quickly pull another in from the loader to repeat the process.

While CO2 tanks use a liquid that turns into gas, paintball guns use tanks filled with pressurized air. This power source helps the paintball gun produce more consistent results, helping to prevent issues with pressure and loading.

Why Use Compressed Air in a Paintball Gun?

With air compressor tanks in paintball guns, players gain the upper hand over those using CO2. When compared to the average pressure rating for a CO2 tank, a paintball gun air compressor can provide over twice as much capacity. These tanks maintain constant pressure throughout to deliver steady performance in warm or cold weather and during rapid fire.

Paintball gun air compressor tanks are also easy to refill and easy to quickly top off between matches. With constant and stable pressure, a paintball gun air compressor tank produces less wear on paintball guns and components, making compressed air the smarter investment and better choice regardless of how the paintball guns are used.

How to Fill a Paintball Gun Air Compressor Tank

Filling the air compressor tank in a paintball gun is simple, and something you can do often to keep it topped off. To fill the air compressor tank in a paintball gun:

  • Invest in the right air compressor: Compressors from the hardware store are incapable of achieving enough pressure. Invest in a compressor pump with a rating at or above 5000 pounds per square inch (psi).
  • Fill the paintball gun air compressor tank: Attach your compressor piping to the tank and fill — without going too rapidly — while watching your pressure gauge so you know when to stop.

Choosing a Paintball Gun Air Compressor

In most cases, paintball guns use compressed air tanks with high pressure ratings, generally ranging from 3000 psi up to 5000 psi. The paintball guns balance the pressure using a regulator connected to the piping to achieve the ideal output.

To make sure you can fill tanks to their maximum capacity, invest in a high-pressure paintball gun air compressor with a rating of 5000 psi or higher. Speak to an expert for help making sure you make the right decision to satisfy your needs while staying on budget.

Get Help Finding the Right Paintball Gun Air Compressor

At Quincy Compressor, we manufacture an extensive lineup of powerful compressors suited for a wide range of applications. For expert help choosing the right paintball gun air compressor, please contact us online.

What Is Class Zero Air?

ISO 8573.1 and ISO 12500 provide a classification system to measure a compressor’s ability to gauge the main contaminants in compressed air systems. This standard provides numerous compressor purity classes and identifies contaminants that may be present in the system. This classification system features nine classes.

What Is Class 0 Air and How Does It Work?

Contaminant and purity classes offer a compressed air specification system for the main contaminants in compressed air systems. Class zero air represents the best air quality possible and can ensure that compressed air is oil-free. Class zero air compressors meet rigorous guidelines and specifications to ensure the highest level of air quality possible.

A class zero air compressor offers world-class performance and ensures premium efficiency, reliability and quality. High-quality air compressors prevent oil contamination that leads to production downtime, product spoilage and even product recall. Using a high-quality air compressor can ensure your brand maintains its reputation and productivity.

Air Quality Standards

Researching different compressed air systems is the foundation when following the best practices for using compressed air. In the majority of cases, users select air compressors by comparing technical data from equipment manufacturers. The International Standards Organization (ISO) established the 8573 compressed air quality standard to help users more carefully compare important information about compressors. The ISO 8573 details how to measure and define compressed air quality.

The ISO has established the 12500 filter standard to help users understand how manufacturers test and rate compressed air filters. ISO 12500 helps define important performance details, including compressed air temperature and pressure measurements.

ISO 8573.1

ISO 8573.1 air standards feature three main contaminant types that are prevalent in compressed air systems:

 

  • Compression process contaminants: During the compression process, impurities may be introduced into the compression system. Common types of these contaminants include lubricant from the compressor, vaporized lubricant and wear particles.
  • In-built contaminants: In-built contaminants include compressed air systems containing common impurities, including mineral deposits, bacteria, pipe scale or rust.
  • Surrounding compression system: Contaminants surrounding the compression system may enter the air system through the compressor’s intake. These contaminants may include airborne particles, hydrocarbon vapors or water vapor.

 

ISO 12500

ISO 12500 sets a standard to define critical performance indicators that provide users certifiable system performance metrics. ISO 12500 is a multi-part standard that quantifies the capacity of adsorption filters to remove vapor particles. This filter standard works well with ISO 8573’s air quality standard to provide users important details about the performance of an air compressor. ISO 12500 tests coalescing filters for the ability to remove oil aerosols, adsorption filter for vapor removal capacities and solid contaminant removal for particulate filters.

The following are details on different parts of ISO 12500:

 

  • ISO 12500-1:2007: ISO 12500-1 specifies test procedures and layouts to test a coalescing filter’s ability to remove oil aerosols and defines the filter’s overall removal performance.
  • ISO 12500-2:2007: ISO 12500-2 gives means to indicate the performance of adsorption filters and their total capacity of removing vapor from the air.
  • ISO 12500-3:2009: ISO 12500-3 outlines metrics that can test particulate filters for their ability to remove solid contaminants.

 

Class 0 and Oil-Free Air Compressors

Oil-free compressors are important tools used to produce a range of products, including paper, medication and semiconductors. Even the smallest presence of oil in these applications can damage products and initiate a product recall. The term oil-free air compressor means the compressor meets certain standards to reach the highest quality certification. At Quincy Compressor, our QOF compressors, QOFT compressors and WIS compressors are oil-free and have been awarded the class zero air certification:

 

  • QOF series compressors: The QOF oil-free scroll compressor meets class zero standards and provides top-class performance. Prioritizing premium efficiency and quality, QOF scroll compressors offer outstanding sustainability and can minimize your total cost of ownership. These air compressors are built to perform in any environment while maintaining production efficiency.
  • QOFT series compressors: The QOFT series rotary tooth and screw compressors provide 100% oil-free air, industry-leading precision and reliability. QOFT air compressors are commonly used in many industries, including pharmaceutical manufacturing, food and beverage processing, fermentation, wastewater treatment and more. These air compressors offer advanced controls and networking abilities with a strong design that is easy to service.
  • WIS series compressors: The WIS oil-free water-injected screw compressor provides oil-free technology and improved efficiency with the advanced cooling capability of water. The low temperatures of compressed air can help reduce stress and wear on the components to ensure longevity. The water-injected screw of these compressors can produce highly efficient and near isothermal compression.

 

Benefits of Class 0 Air Compressors

Air purity is of the utmost importance for many applications and businesses. Oil-free air compressors are designed to meet class zero air specifications and follow ISO 8573-1 air standards and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) compressed air requirements. Their advantages include:

  • Energy-efficiency: High-quality air compressors can increase energy efficiency and provide numerous benefits for companies. Many compressors feature improved technology, including the superior cooling capability of water, to be more energy-efficient.
  • Regulation compliance: Air compressors can help businesses meet operational regulations, including FDA compressed air requirements, to provide the purest air possible. Many industries can benefit from high-quality air compressors, including pharmaceuticals, electronics and food and beverage services. Class zero air compressors offer precise equipment and technology to ensure products are free from potential contamination.
  • Oil-free and clean air: Oil-free air compressors can deliver the highest level of air purity and prevent the risk of contamination. Additionally, oil-free air can help your business obtain an FDA certification.
  • Innovative technology: These compressors feature the latest oil-free technology to improve efficiency and productivity. The compressor technology meets the class zero standard and provides additional protection against product recalls and lowered brand reputation because it prevents even the smallest oil levels from contaminating your products.
  • Reliable engineering: Reliable compressor engineering can create a lasting product that can maximize uptime. In tandem with strong engineering, routine and proper maintenance is essential for extending the life of your air compressor.
  • Reduced maintenance cost: Many air compressors are low maintenance with low operating costs. Smart maintenance allows machines to offer faster and less expensive service. Easy access panels can allow for quick access and maintenance during routine service visits.
  • Lower cost of ownership: Oil-free technology can reduce potential expenses because these compressors don’t require expensive filter replacements. There are also no added costs to combat pressure drops in filters. In addition to low maintenance costs, there are also lower costs of treating oily condensate.

quincy compressor qof series air compressors

Learn More About Quincy Compressor QOF Series Air Compressors

Quincy Compressor offers reliable air compressor systems with True Blue reliability and some of the industry’s leading warranties. Our air compressors are specially designed to maintain their function and durability after continual heavy use. We pride ourselves on offering tough and ruggedly efficient air compressors that are supported by various accessories and air treatment options.

Browse our QOF series air compressors or contact us today for more information.

Marine air compressors are a crucial component of a ship. A marine air compressor decreases the air volume and increases its energetic potential to provide additional power for other tasks onboard. A ship air compressor’s purpose is to maintain the overall function of a ship.

How Marine Compressors Are Different

Unlike regular air compressors, marine air compressors are intended for use on a ship. Most regular air compressors cannot withstand marine conditions due to salt in the water and air. Marine air compressors are made out of metal that can tolerate these conditions without warping. Using other air compressors would likely result in a device failure or even a safety hazard.

Uses for Air Compressors on Ships

What exactly does a marine air compressor do? Ship air compressors can serve multiple functions depending on their location onboard. Marine air compressors are generally divided into four categories:

  • Main
  • Deck
  • Emergency
  • Topping Up

Main Marine Air Compressor

The main marine air compressor acts as the power source for starting primary and auxiliary engines. The main marine air compressor stores pressurized air, so it can be released when the engines start. This compressor is typically at high capacity since starting the primary and auxiliary engines requires a significant amount of power.

Deck Marine Air Compressor

Deck marine air compressors are small and portable for maximum mobility. This mobility allows them to serve a variety of functions on the deck, such as operating power tools when making small repairs or completing cleaning and sanitation-related tasks. In case of emergencies on deck, such as a fire, a deck marine air compressor can help operate a fire pump. Responding quickly to emergencies on a ship is crucial, as they could compromise the safety of the ship and the people onboard.

Emergency Marine Air Compressor

Emergency marine air compressors provide a backup power source in case of an emergency. In a potential power failure, this compressor can provide the power necessary to operate the primary and auxiliary engines. Having at least one emergency air compressor onboard is crucial to maintaining the ship’s function.

Topping Up Marine Air Compressor

Topping up marine air compressors compensate for any existing or potential leaks in a system. They are connected to devices that monitor the current pressure within the system. If this pressure dips below a specified level, a topping up marine air compressor can restore the pressure to the desired level.

Trust Quincy Compressor for Ship Air Compressors

At Quincy Compressor, we provide reliable and high-quality products for the most demanding applications. Our compressed air and vacuum products are used in a variety of industries around the world. Because our products are reliable, they maintain their value over time.

Our primary goal is to meet your needs. That’s why our network of professional and knowledgeable experts offers 24-hour service and support to ensure your complete satisfaction. Contact us today for more information about our marine air compressors.

Electronics manufacturing is a high-precision industry that requires efficient production to keep up with demand. Integrating air compressors into the product line and components themselves improves the quality of your products. Quincy Compressor carries a range of air compressors for electronics to support efficient and contaminant-free manufacturing.

Air Compressors for Electronics

The electronics industry involves extensive production that often relies on air compressors. Compressed air is also valuable to the function of electronics themselves. Manufacturers prefer compressed air for electronic applications because it has high energy conversion efficiency while remaining low impact.

One of the most common uses of air compressors for electronics is printed circuit board (PCB) cleaning. PCBs are delicate electronic parts with high sensitivity. Manufacturers use the low impact and abrasiveness of air compressors to clear dust and other particles from these components during post-production.

Compressed air also powers pick and place machines in electronics manufacturing. Electronic manufacturers produce high volumes of intricate components in their product lines. Pick and place machines are fast and precise robotic equipment that can place small parts on various components, like PCBs. Pick and place equipment also transports components to different process lines to keep components moving through production.

With the versatility of air compressors, they have a place in many other electronic applications as well. Other possible uses include:

The Importance of Oil-Free Compressors in Electronics

Many high-performance air compressors are oil injected. While these compressors use advanced filtering techniques to remove oil, contamination is still possible. In electronic products and components, like PCBs, parts may not function correctly with oil contamination.

The primary concern with oil-injected filters is temperature control. Filters in these compressors only perform correctly at a specific temperature, and when the ambient temperature rises, the filter is at risk. During these moments of unintentional temperature fluctuation, oil carry-over increases.

Oil-free compressors eliminate the risk of contamination. They also prevent the lost time, increased maintenance and wasted materials that come with potential mistakes or product damage on the product line. This means your finished components are more reliable for consumers.

Oil-free air compressors in electronics also eliminate:

  • The time and money spent cleaning oil filters.
  • Risk of compressed air pipeline fires.
  • The cost of replacing filtration systems.
  • High energy costs associated with oil-injected compressors.

At Quincy Compressor, we’re familiar with the need for efficiency, low impact and cleanliness in electronics manufacturing. Check out our selection of oil-free air compressors and find a suitable model for your application.

Contact Quincy Compressor for Oil-Free Air Compressors in Electronics

With over a century in business, Quincy Compressor is a reliable air compressor provider for electronics manufacturing and many other industries. Our expert engineering paired with responsive customer service ensures you’re receiving the best product for your application. Our industry-leading warranty plans ensure your air compressor meets your performance standards.

To learn more about our products, contact us or get a quote.

Constant exposure to loud noises in the workplace can be unavoidable, but it can also lead to health issues in the future. Using silent air compressors can reduce occupational risk and eliminate a significant amount of noise, prioritizing you and your employees’ health.

Why Use a Quiet Air Compressor?

Using a quiet air compressor reduces the risk of hearing damage. Occupational noise is often difficult to avoid, but prolonged exposure can result in tinnitus, which causes a constant ringing in the ears. Investing in a silent air compressor can decrease the risk of potential hearing issues.

Additionally, a loud work environment can cause hypertension, which can lead to heart issues or a stroke. Long-term occupational noise can also result in behavioral issues and sleep disorders, like insomnia.

The Quietest Air Compressors

There are many types of silent air compressors to help reduce occupational hazards and ensure your employees stay healthy in the long term. Quiet air compressors maintain their value over time and ensure the safety of yourself and your team.

Q13160VQ — Single Stage

This single-stage Quincy air compressor can deliver 12.8 cfm at 90 psi and 14.6 cfm at 40 psi. Because of its RPM, this air compressor operates quietly, and its aluminum head enables it to function at low temperatures. This 60-gallon air compressor also features easy-to-read pressure gauges and ASME safety valves.

Q12126VPQ — Single Stage

This 26-gallon single-stage air compressor is portable and delivers 8.3 cfm at 40 psi and 7.4 cfm at 90 psi. It has an oil-lubricated cast iron pump that provides 10 thousand hours of pump life. This air compressor is also offered in an electric-powered version and includes a low RPM for exceptionally quiet function.

QGS Line — Rotary Screw

The QGS Quincy air compressor series features the most advanced rotary screw air compressor technology for peak performance. It contains a high-efficiency intake filter and a long life V-belt drive. The QGS line also has a low oil carryover and comes with eight thousand hours of lubricant.

QGD Line — Rotary Screw

The Quincy QGD line is featured in Quincy Compressor’s world-class rotary screw compressor lineup because of its industry-leading flow and energy at 100-125-150 psig. This line can also network up to 6 machines, making these Quincy air compressors ideal for large compressed air tasks.

Electric Air Compressor

The Quincy electric air compressors are quiet and fume-free, making them suitable for indoor use without extra ventilation. These air compressors also come in multiple portable versions that can be transported easily around a job site.

QV1.5-10 hp Direct Drive Rotary Vane Vacuum Pump

The Quincy CV series vacuum pumps range from 1.5 hp to 10 hp in a variety of compact designs. They also contain an inlet screen and air cooling. Without non-metallic vanes, these vacuum pumps have a long lifespan and can be easily transported.

Contact Quincy Compressor for Silent Air Compressors

At Quincy Compressor, we provide reliable customer support and high-quality products that are used across multiple industries. Our knowledgeable experts offer 24-hour service and support to ensure our products meet your needs. Contact us with any questions about our quietest air compressors.

Avoiding Rust With Your Air Compressor

Posted on: July 30, 2021

Air compressors are versatile energy solutions that form the backbone of many industries. With the proper care, you can keep your air compressor running smoothly for years to come. Overall, the biggest threats to air compressors are water and rust. Over time, a rusting tank can become over-pressured and dangerous. At Quincy Compressor, we’re here […]

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How Are Air Compressors Used in Food Packaging?

Posted on: July 28, 2021

Food and beverage operations make up a high-risk industry, and air compressors are valuable tools throughout processing and packaging. With the need for efficiency, consistency and cleanliness, compressed air meets every requirement. Learn about air compressors for beverage packaging and how food packaging plants can remain contaminant-free. Compressed Air in Food Facilities Compressed air is […]

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A Guide to Air Compressor Fittings

Posted on: July 26, 2021

Air compressor fittings are essential to keeping your unit running efficiently and delivering the air power you require for your operations. Knowing the types of air compressor fittings available is essential to choosing the right components for your specific model, so the experts at Quincy Compressor compiled this guide to help you determine the sizes […]

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Why Is Your Air Compressor Humming?

Posted on: July 23, 2021

Compressors of all sizes produce noise and often get quite loud. If the sound is an unusual one, however, it could be practically deafening. Air compressor humming is common at startup but could also happen during use. If that happens, you can also experience a sudden drop in tank pressure. We’ll let you know what […]

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Questions to Ask Before Buying an Air Compressor

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Posted on: July 20, 2021

If you’re in the market for a new air compressor, you know there is a lot that goes into that decision. You have to think about your usage, tools, power availability, pressure demands, airflow needs and system controls. Then, there are additional features that can improve the results of your air compressor that you’ll need […]

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How Paintball Guns Use Air Compressors

Posted on: July 13, 2021

Compressed air is an increasingly popular choice for casual paintball players and match play, and offers multiple advantages over carbon dioxide (CO2). As a power source, compressed air tanks are reliable solutions players can depend on during high-speed play any time of the year. How Does a Paintball Gun Use an Air Compressor? Paintball guns […]

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What Is Class Zero Air?

Posted on: July 9, 2021

What Is Class Zero Air? ISO 8573.1 and ISO 12500 provide a classification system to measure a compressor’s ability to gauge the main contaminants in compressed air systems. This standard provides numerous compressor purity classes and identifies contaminants that may be present in the system. This classification system features nine classes. What Is Class 0 […]

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What an Air Compressor Does on a Ship

Posted on: July 5, 2021

Marine air compressors are a crucial component of a ship. A marine air compressor decreases the air volume and increases its energetic potential to provide additional power for other tasks onboard. A ship air compressor’s purpose is to maintain the overall function of a ship. How Marine Compressors Are Different Unlike regular air compressors, marine […]

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Air Compressors in Electronics Manufacturing

Posted on: June 30, 2021

Electronics manufacturing is a high-precision industry that requires efficient production to keep up with demand. Integrating air compressors into the product line and components themselves improves the quality of your products. Quincy Compressor carries a range of air compressors for electronics to support efficient and contaminant-free manufacturing. Air Compressors for Electronics The electronics industry involves […]

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The 6 Quietest Quincy Air Compressors

Posted on: June 18, 2021

Constant exposure to loud noises in the workplace can be unavoidable, but it can also lead to health issues in the future. Using silent air compressors can reduce occupational risk and eliminate a significant amount of noise, prioritizing you and your employees’ health. Why Use a Quiet Air Compressor? Using a quiet air compressor reduces […]

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