quincycompressor

Cycling flow schematic

Portable Air Compressors

Quincy Compressor’s portable air compressors offer industry-leading power and efficiency in a small package. They are an excellent choice for home/DIY use, while still delivering the power and reliability necessary for commercial applications. Backed by an industry-leading extended warranty option, Quincy portable air compressors are built for the long haul, providing excellent value in nearly any situation.

If you’re on the market for a new portable air compressor, read on to learn more about why Quincy is the brand of choice for demanding customers.

How Portable Compressors Work

The majority of portable compressors — including those manufactured by Quincy — feature a single-stage, reciprocating/piston design. Piston compressors work by forcing air through an inlet valve into a cylinder, where the reciprocating motion of a piston compresses it. Once it compresses the air to the desired level, it activates a discharge valve, sending it out to power a tool or whatever attachment to which the unit will be connected.

Single-stage compressors feature a single valve and piston assembly. This makes them smaller, lighter and more portable, but limits the amount of power the unit can provide. For this reason, they are most commonly used in garages, workshops, construction sites and other applications where you can sacrifice continuous power for the sake of value or portability.

 

Finding the Right Product for Your Needs

To select the best portable air compressor for your application, you should consider the following factors:

  • Capacity: The capacity of a compressor is the amount of air a unit can produce, measured in CFM (cubic feet/minute). A higher CFM rating means a unit will be able to power more tools at once.
  • Pressure: We measure compressor pressure ratings in PSIG (pounds per square inch gauge). Most tools require a continuous pressure of 90 PSIG to operate properly. Other applications require higher or lower pressures. Be clear on your requirements before making a decision.
  • Power: The horsepower (HP) of a portable compressor is not directly related to its pressure or capacity; rather, it refers to the efficiency of the unit’s motor. More horsepower is required to drive higher capacity or higher pressure compressors, though a high horsepower unit with low CFM or PSIG ratings will be inefficient and costly to run.

Other things to consider include tank size, whether you want a unit powered by gas or electricity and whether you’ll be working in a sensitive environment where an oil-free design is necessary. For more information about Quincy compressors, visit individual product pages, where you can find detailed specifications and potential applications.

Quincy Portable Compressor Products At a Glance

Quincy’s portable single-stage air compressors boast a number of professional features at a price that’s right for any customer, including:

  • A cast-iron cylinder, crankshaft and valve plate, delivering improved durability and strength
  • Aluminum head and fin design for improved heat dissipation, reducing wear on the motor
  • Working pressures between 110 and 135 PSI, with a standard 1/4″ pressure regulator
  • A fully enclosed belt guard and ASME-standard safety valves

Let our team match you with the right portable air compressor for your needs. Contact a sales representative in your area to discuss your intended application today.

At Quincy Compressor, we are also proud to offer high-quality portable air compressor parts.

Learn more about portable single-stage air compressors here.

How to Choose a Portable Air Compressor for DIY Household Maintenance

We’ve all had those projects around the house that were just too difficult to complete without a professional air compressor. Whether you’re painting, working on your car or just inflating some bicycle tires, a portable air compressor is a fantastic investment that will make all sorts of DIY household maintenance projects easier to complete.

What type of air compressor should you look for to help you complete your DIY projects?

Possible Projects Around the House

Household maintenance projects can be completed without a portable air compressor, but why would you put in the extra effort when a little compressed air can make these jobs so much easier?

  • Inflating. Whether you’re trying to inflate bicycle tires, car tires or sports equipment, a portable compressor could make the job easier. Plus, it will save your arms — no more handheld pump for you.
  • Installing. Hardwood floors, trim and crown molding are great options for adding a bit of class to your home, but without a portable compressor and a nail gun, you’re left placing each nail and hammering it in by hand. For a large area of hardwood flooring or trim, this could take hours.
  • Repairing. Do you need a snazzy new fence to surround your property, or do you have one already that is just in need of some repair? A portable compressor, again paired with that nail gun, could make this job a breeze.
  • Painting. You’re already dreading breaking out the brushes and rollers, aren’t you? If you’re painting, why not let compressed air do the work for you? Just attach an airbrush to your portable air compressor and go to town — you might never buy another paintbrush, especially since you can use it to paint just about everything from furniture to walls.

Possible Projects in the Garage

If you like working on your cars, a portable air compressor is probably already on your wish list. You can use it for all sorts of things, including:

  • Tires. Trying to break loose a lug nut on a tire with just the little bitty lug wrench that comes with your car is a nightmare unless you’re a bodybuilder. Get it done with no effort at all with your air compressor and an impact wrench.
  • Maintenance. An air ratchet can be just the thing to break loose those stubborn bolts, or the ones that are just too hard to reach. Instead of busting your knuckles on stuck bolts, bring your compressor along.
  • Painting. Just like painting your house, you can use your portable air compressor and an airbrush to paint your car. Get a shop-quality paint job in the comfort of your own garage.

How to Pick a Portable Air Compressor

How can you find the perfect portable air compressor that fits your need? You need to consider four things:

  1. What you’re doing with the compressor. Are you painting, nailing, working on your car or just inflating some tires? Or are you looking for a multipurpose compressor you can use for all these tasks and more?
  2. The tool or tools you’re using. Inflating tires requires an inflator. Nailing floorboards requires a nail gun, and working on cars requires a variety of different impact tools.
  3. The CFM and PSI of the tool. Air compressors have two ratings, other than the tank size — the CFM or cubic feet per minute, and the PSI or pounds per square inch. The CFM determines how fast the air is delivered to your tools — some tools require a higher CFM than others. The PSI determines how hard your tool drives — how much power is behind that impact wrench or air hammer.
  4. The tank capacity. This variable determines how much air your portable tank can hold before it needs to be refilled. The higher the tank capacity, the longer you can work before you run out of air.

How to Use the Portable Air Compressor

For inflating tires, all you need is a three-gallon tank, unless you’re running a bicycle repair station and are inflating tires all day long. In terms of CFM and PSI, you don’t need a ton of either. Most inflators only require about 0.5 CFM. A 90 PSI tank is more than sufficient for these needs.

For nailing, the tool you’ll need will depend on the job. Flooring nailers are very lightweight pieces of equipment, requiring only 0.2 CFM. Framing nailers, on the other hand, require a little more power — around 3CFM. For running nail guns, you probably shouldn’t need more than a four-gallon tank.

Auto work requires quite a bit of power to run the equipment. An air ratchet, for example, requires an average of 6CFM. The same is required for an impact wrench. Air hammers only require slightly less, coming in at 4CFM.

It’s important to check your particular air tool for its specific CFM requirements. Auto work requires the most air storage, so you’re probably going to need something in the range of an 11-gallon tank or larger. Painting is the most CFM intensive activity. Most paint guns will need between 6-7 CFM and an eight-gallon tank to get the job done.

It is important to note the CFM of your tools — every air tool will have an average CFM rating. The numbers we’ve provided are only estimates. To get the best results out of your portable air compressor, look for one that provides 30-50% more CFM than your tools call for. If you’re going to run more than one tool, combine their required CFM and purchase a compressor that is 30-50% higher than that combined number.

There are many essential factors to consider when selecting a compressor, including:

  • The pounds per square inch gauge (PSIG)
  • Cubic feet per minute (CFM)
  • Horsepower
  • Size of the tank
  • The duty cycle
  • The type of motor it uses
  • Lubricated vs. oil-free systems
  • Rotary screw vs. reciprocating/piston systems
  • Air treatment options
  • Required piping.

You’ll also need to think about whether regulation is required, what kind of cooling features you need and which mounting options make the most sense for your workspace.

As you review different compression systems, various specifications and other data, you may encounter terminology with which you are unfamiliar. To make things easier, Qunicy Compressor has compiled a list of different air compressor specifications and what those specifications mean.

Air Compressor Specs: Here’s What You Need to Know

Although they all perform the same function — transforming intake air into filtered, compressed air — there are several different types of air compressors, systems and additional features to consider. Choosing the right air compressor for your business or workshop means navigating the different air compressor specs to make an informed decision.

Whether you are a hobbyist seeking an air compressor for your home garage or a business owner implementing compressed air into your industrial processes, here is a brief rundown of some of the most commonly cited facts, figures and configurations, and what they mean:

1. Pressure and PSIG

An air compressor’s primary goal is to pressurize intake air for various industrial processes. The ability of a compressor to pressurize air is measured in pounds per square inch gauge, or PSIG, which is a comparison of the pressure inside the tank and the barometric pressure. Barometric pressure is the amount of air pressure in the atmosphere.

Most pneumatic tools require 90 PSIG to operate, but some heavy-duty tools and applications will need more. You should always check the manufacturer’s listed PSI or PSIG requirements for your device or end-product to avoid operating with too little or too much power.

2. Capacity and CFM

The capacity of an air compressor is the amount of air it can produce at a specific PSIG. This output capacity is measured in cubic feet per minute, or CFM.

Capacity is one of the most significant air compressor purchase factors, especially if you intend to run multiple tools at once. When calculating the required CFM, you should consider the pressure level you need and if you plan to use your compressed air continuously or sporadically.

For example, high-pressure tools that require constant or near-constant airflow need a higher capacity air compressor. For machines that use short bursts of air, such as a nail gun, a lower capacity is suitable. You may need more than one air compressor for industries that require multiple capacities.

3. Horsepower

All compressors have an engine and motor component. That motor drives a crankshaft which moves pistons that produce the compressed air through an intricate mechanical process. As with automotive engines, we measure the amount of work the motor can perform in horsepower. One horsepower is equal to 550 foot-pounds per second, or 745.7 watts.

When it comes to air compressors, however, horsepower is not as straightforward as it is when considering the power of a new car or truck. It should be one of several air compressor purchase factors you consider. While a minimum amount of air compressor horsepower is required to deliver specific levels of pressure or capacity, many compressors are overpowered and inefficient. A well-designed compressor should be able to produce four CFM at 100 PSIG for every unit of power.

4. Tank Size

Most compressors have a tank to store pressurized air until you are ready to use it. Large tanks mean you can go longer without running the compressor motor, but you’ll have plenty of compressed air on hand to power your tools. Because your compressor is running less, you may see cost savings reflected in your energy bill.

The best place to start is a minimum of five gallons of storage space per CFM.

5. Duty Cycle

An air compressor’s duty cycle is the amount of time it can operate before it needs to shut down. The duty cycle is expressed as a percentage.

For example, a compressor with a 15 percent duty cycle would need eight-and-a-half minutes of downtime for every one-and-a-half minutes of run time. An air compressor with a 25 percent duty cycle would run for one-fourth of the total cycle time. Compressors with low run times such as these are ideal for small applications or tools and are not typically used in an industrial environment.

Heavy-duty compressors usually have a duty cycle of 35 percent or higher, including air compressors with 50 and 75 percent duty cycle. Heavy-duty cycles are suitable for workshops, garages and some high-demand tools. Compressors with a 100 percent duty cycle are “ultimate duty,” and their engines contain cooling components to prevent overheating. Ultimate duty air compressors are used in industry or factory environments because they can keep up with the constant demand of highly compressed air.

6. Motor Type

Most air compressors operate using standard, three-face induction motors. They are typically powered by electricity, diesel or natural gas. Electric motors are reliable, economical and capable of generating enough power for standard use at home or around your workshop or garage.

Gas-powered compressors, on the other hand, tend to be more powerful and offer the convenience of portability. You should choose an air compressor that fits with your personal or business needs. To determine which type is best for your applications, consider:

  • Electricity costs
  • Fuel availability
  • Initial investment budget
  • Portability

7. Lubrication

When an air compressor has movable parts, those components require lubrication to reduce wear-and-tear and prolong the machine’s life. Lubricated air compressors inject an oil-based solution into the compression chamber, which distributes it to the parts. These air compressors require an oil filter to keep residual oil out of the compressed air. For applications and industries that require 100 percent oil-free compressed air, there are oil-free compressors.

8. Rotary Screw

Rotary screw air compressor specifications refer to a positive displacement compression system powered by two counter-rotating helical screws, also called rotors. Air is trapped between these two rotors and that air decreases in volume as it moves, resulting in compressed air. Rotary screw compressor specifications include both lubricated and oil-free compressors, which are designed for prolonged use. Although rotary screw compressors are very durable and efficient, they require ongoing preventive maintenance by a trained professional for best results.

9. Reciprocating Piston

Reciprocating or piston air compressor systems are positive displacement compressors that use a single-stage crankshaft-driven piston and cylinder to draw air in before expelling it into the storage tank. These machines expel air using a single-piston stroke of approximately 120 pounds per square inch (PSI).

Two-stage reciprocating compressors implement a second step, where an additional, smaller piston brings the pressure up to around 175 PSI. These machines are simple to operate and require little ongoing maintenance, making them ideal for individuals using an air compressor in their home workshop or garage.

10. Multi-Stage Systems

Multi-stage systems are reciprocating or piston air compressors that compress and cool the air using more than one cylinder. Multi-stage compressors deliver high volumes of compressed air and can power more than one tool at a time. Because these systems are so efficient, they are often a very cost-effective compressed air method in the longterm. However, because this system has more components, expect a higher initial investment and less floor space.

11. Regulation

An air compressor’s regulator maintains a constant pressure in the compressed air, and it is crucial in industries that require air with no fluctuation. Pressure regulation is essential for larger HP units that don’t need to run at full capacity all the time. An air compressor pressure regulator prevents you from having to start and stop the motor continually. They are also ideal for energy conservation.

The two main types of regulators are:

  • Load/no load control, which vents the unit when a given pressure is reached.
  • Modulation control, which throttles the inlet plate, causing the machine to draw in less air.

You can also choose between a compressor with a manual or automatic regulator.

The pressure measurement displayed on your regulator gauge refers to the pressure level of the discharged air that enters your air hose from the tank. You can adjust this gauge to your required pressure level. Keep in mind that compressor regulators can only move the pressure level down and cannot raise the pressure inside your tank past its maximum output capacity.

12. Cooling Features

Cooling an air compressor is essential to preventing failure during continuous use. Cooling features are also critical for preventing overheating, which can be dangerous for both your compressor and those operating it. Air compressors can possess different types of cooling technologies, including:

  • Heat exchangers
  • Intercooling
  • Diaphragm cooling
  • Aftercooling

Many more types of cooling technologies exist besides the ones mentioned here. Some of these cooling methods use water, and some use air. Always choose cooling features designed for your size and type of air compressor. The type of cooling system you use will determine your machine’s maintenance schedule, especially if it’s open or closed. If you are unsure, contact an air compressor service professional.

13. Air Treatment

Instead of using raw compressed air, you can implement several air treatment options in your workspace, including air compressor filters, condensate management products and air dryers.

Air compressor filtration systems remove oil, particulates, dirt, debris and moisture from compressed air. These are essential in environments that require pure, contaminant-free compressed air for the quality of their end-products. You can choose from standard and high-pressure filters, as well as standalone mist eliminators.

Condensate management products include electronic and pneumatic drains, as well as condensate purifiers with disposable filters. Electronic, no loss drains are energy efficient and possess an optimum reservoir capacity, which saves you time and energy. Pneumatic, no loss drains also uphold energy efficiency by wasting no air and operating on demand. Alternatively, condensate purifiers are lightweight and use carbon-free filtering media to supplement the ease of their disposable filters.

You can use air dryers to remove excess moisture from your machine, as well as your compressed air. Otherwise, this moisture could damage your air compressor system, cause premature wear-and-tear on its inner mechanisms or contaminate compressed air. There are multiple types of air drying systems, but the two most popular are refrigerated and desiccant dryers.

14. Air Compressor Piping

Air compressor piping connects your air compressor to all the devices that use its energy. High-quality piping and professional installation are crucial for sufficient air movement. There are several things to consider when implementing your piping system, including layout considerations, pipe material and more. For example, sharp angles in your piping can impede airflow, increase turbulence and cause three to five pounds per square inch differential (PSID) of pressure loss.

15. Mounting Options

Compressors come in all shapes, sizes and configurations. Not every business or workshop has the same amount of space, and that’s where portability and mounting options are useful. You can choose a portable or stationary air compressor, or you can opt for a trailer-mounted system. Choose a configuration that allows you the most flexibility and makes sense for your work environment. However, be aware that the larger your model, the more power you will require.

Always check that your power supply is adequate before making your final purchase. You should also be sure not to mount an electric compressor too far from the power source. Always install your compressor in a well-ventilated, spacious area and do not allow it to press against walls or other objects while in use.

16. Efficiency

Your air compressor’s efficiency refers to how well it operates, how it minimizes energy waste and how effectively it compresses high-quality air. You can implement several practices to maximize your compressor’s efficiency. For example, you can take steps to improve your workspace’s air quality, including the air’s cleanliness and humidity level. You can also choose to invest in high-quality equipment designed to last a long time.

Questions? Consult the Air Experts at Quincy Compressor

Although air compressors are easy enough to use, they can be some of the most complex pieces of machinery in your workplace. Since the 1920s, Quincy Compressor has been dedicated to helping consumers stay informed about the products they choose and crafting machinery — including air compressors, air dryers and other compressed air equipment — that deliver uncompromising reliability and performance.

If you have additional questions about air compressor specs or want to learn more about the various compressor options available to you, contact a knowledgable Quincy Compressor representative for assistance or use our sales and service locator to find a dealer near you.

Compressed air is vital to many operations both industrial and otherwise, so you want to make sure you buy a compressor with enough power to meet your needs. If you want to know what horsepower you should get for an air compressor that can handle all your applications, it helps to start with an understanding of what that number means.

Understanding Air Compressor Horsepower

When shopping for a new air compressor, many customers look to its horsepower rating to get a sense of how much power it can provide. The reason for this is understandable — most of us are familiar with horsepower ratings and use them as a factor when buying a car, lawnmower or other equipment.

The truth is, however, that horsepower ratings don’t tell the whole story when it comes to what a compressor can and can’t do. Instead, a compressor’s horsepower is just one rating that should be considered when shopping for a new unit. In fact, it may even be one of the least significant.

air compressor horse power

What Is Horsepower?

Horsepower is a measure of the amount of work an engine can perform. Several different definitions exist for the term. Car aficionados are likely to be aware of the distinction between standard horsepower (HP) and brake horsepower (BHP), which is the measure of a motor’s power without any of the losses incurred by running auxiliary engine components. Most of the time, when we talk about horsepower in a more abstract sense, we are talking about a unit of power equivalent to 550 foot-pounds per second, or 745.7 watts.

All compressors have a motor component that is rated in horsepower. A compressor motor’s job is simply to drive the cylinders or rotary screw that compress air. The process by which this occurs is complex. As a result, the relationship between the amount of horsepower a motor has and the amount of work a compressor can do is not always straightforward.

HP vs. CFM vs. PSIG

Horsepower (HP), pressure (PSIG) and capacity (CFM) are the three main measurements of what a compressor can do. PSIG is a measure of air pressure. To work properly, most air-powered tools require at least 90 PSIG. CFM refers to the maximum amount of air a compressor can produce at a given pressure level. To run multiple air powered tools at once, a higher CFM rating is required.

When all other factors are equal, horsepower is a measure of the compressor motor’s efficiency at producing a given level of CFM and PSIG. For example, if a 5 HP air compressor and a 10 HP air compressor can both produce 100 PSIG of air pressure at a rate of 15 CFM, the 5 HP model is working more efficiently, saving you money on fuel without a loss in performance.

There are, of course, limits to this efficiency. Most well-designed compressors produce approximately 4 CFM at 100 PSIG per unit of horsepower.

How Important Are Horsepower Ratings When Shopping for a New Compressor?

A compressor’s horsepower rating is an important measure of what it can do and how well it can do it. Under no circumstances will a 5 HP air compressor be able to do the same job as a 100 HP air compressor. However, it is important to remember that horsepower alone shouldn’t be the only factor you consider. The “best” 5 HP air compressor may not be the right one for you if it doesn’t deliver the CFM or PSIG you require of it.

Other Factors to Consider

When you’re shopping for a new air compressor, there are a few additional factors to consider, such as portability. Portable air compressors come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Many are light enough to carry, while larger models have wheels so they can be easily transported. Tank sizes for portable air compressors range from 2- to 30-gallon capacities for light-duty to more demanding jobs.

Stationary air compressors are designed to be bolted to a fixed area and wired directly into your electrical circuit. With larger tanks and greater horsepower, stationary air compressors are ideal for workshops and garages.

The tank size of your air compressor also determines the scope of work you can accomplish. Air compressor tank size can range from 2- to 80-gallon capacities. If you’re using tools that require a high volume of air for continuous use, a larger tank is an ideal choice. However, if your tools only use quick bursts of air, the tank will drain much more slowly, so a capacity of 2 to 6 gallons will likely be sufficient.

What Horsepower to Get for an Air Compressor

Air compressors typically have a horsepower rating between 1.5 and 6.5, though some larger, stationary air compressors can have up to 15 HP. If you are using standard electric power outlets, you’ll need an air compressor at 2 HP or less because standard AC cords require lower voltage to function.

The type of air compressor you get also affects the horsepower ratings. If you were running an electric air compressor at 5 HP, you would need to run a gas- or diesel-powered air compressor at 10 HP to do the same amount of work as the electric model. This is because a gas engine actually produces power through its own combustion, while electric motors draw their power from an external system.

Quincy Compressors has a complete selection of 5 HP, 10 HP and larger air compressors for sale. Check out our resources page for detailed technical information about our horsepower ratings or contact a sales representative for assistance.

 

Contact Us Learn More Find a Dealer Near You

Air compressors come in all different sizes and configurations to support a wide range of potential applications. You can find them everywhere from power and manufacturing plants to the garages of avid DIY enthusiasts.

As a result, the cost of an air compressor can vary widely. Compressor machines may range from portable consumer units to large-scale industrial installations. When shopping for a new air compressor, it’s important both to budget accordingly and understand exactly what you’ll receive.

Air Compressor Types

Knowing the various types of compressors and how they work is essential to understanding why certain models cost more than others. Rotary screw compressors are the most popular type, particularly for heavy-duty applications. As the name suggests, they feature a large screw that, as it turns, forces air into a cylinder where it is compressed.

Reciprocating/piston compressors, the other major type, use a series of cylinder/valve mechanisms to achieve the same result. Most reciprocating air compressors cost less than comparable rotary screw models, particularly for light- and medium-duty applications.

Another important distinction among compressors is between lubricated and oil-free units. Most compressors are lubricated to reduce wear. For use in sensitive environments where managing potential sources of contamination is a key concern, oil-free compressors are available.

Understanding Air Compressor Ratings

The cost of an air compressor is directly related to the amount of work it can perform and the efficiency with which it can perform it. This is expressed in several different numbers:

  • Pressure: The job of a compressor is to produce air at a given pressure level. We express this in pounds per square inch grade, or PSIG. Most pneumatic tools require 90 PSIG to function properly. For other operations, more or less pressure may be required.
  • Capacity: Capacity is the rate at which a compressor can produce air at a given pressure level. Greater capacity means you can run more tools or other devices at once. Capacity is expressed in cubic feet per minute, or CFM.
  • Horsepower: Either an electric or gas motor drives compressors. We express the power of this motor in horsepower. An efficient motor should produce around 4 CFM at 100 PSIG for every HP. Less efficient air compressors cost more to run but often have a lower purchase price.
  • Tank size: Most compressors have a storage tank for holding compressed air, measured in gallons. Larger storage tanks add to the cost of an air compressor but increase the amount of time required between compression cycles, saving you on fuel and reducing wear on sensitive components.

Warranty Coverage

Warranty is another important factor to consider when shopping for a compressor. As with any major purchase, it’s important to choose a manufacturer that stands behind their work. Extended warranty coverage, if available, may add to the cost of an air compressor up front, but it’s an investment that can give you peace of mind for the long term.

Matching You With the Best Value Air Compressor for Your Needs

Need help finding the best value compressor for your application? Quincy makes it easy with our exclusive Concierge program. Sign up online and get started today.

Use our sales and service locator to find an authorized Quincy Compressor dealer near you.

We understand many of our customers are following strict no-contact orders and opting to postpone needed compressed air services and planned maintenance.

This could be very problematic—causing unexpected breakdowns, production loss or delay and unexpected costs.

Quincy Compressor has a solution…We are now offering no-contact service!

  • We will service your system while refraining from contact with your employees
  • 100% compliance with the local requirements in your area
  • Utilize digital tools to check in with you often about your air system status
  • Provide detailed communication outlining services completed and signature of service report

 

Don’t prolong crucial or routine services! We are here to help in this time of need and want you to know you can Count on Quincy!

Call today and speak with one of our experienced service department team members 855-978-4629!

Be safe and Count on Quincy!

 

Thiago Figueiredo
VP of Aftermarket
Quincy Compressor Customer Center
thiago.figueiredo@quincycompressor.com
Quincycompressor.com

If you’re serious about DIY — whether it’s carpentry, car repair or another pneumatic tool-driven hobby — you’ve likely considered buying your own air compressor at some point. A home air compressor can be a big investment. When considering your choices for an air compressor for home use, select wisely and find a manufacturer you can trust to stand behind the products. That’s the best way to ensure your purchase will deliver a lifetime of reliable use. As you search for the best air compressor for your home, consider the following.

Know the Numbers

There are four important numbers to look at when shopping for a home air compressor:

  • PSIG: Pounds per square inch gauge (PSIG) is a measure of the amount of air pressure a compressor can produce. Most power tools require at least 90 PSIG to run properly.
  • CFM: Cubic feet per minute (CFM) refers to a compressor’s capacity. A higher capacity means a machine can deliver a greater volume of air at a given PSIG. If you plan on running multiple tools at once, the best air compressor will be the one with the highest CFM.
  • Horsepower: We rate compressor motors by horsepower, just like car engines. With a compressor, however, higher HP doesn’t automatically mean higher pressure or greater capacity. Be sure to check PSIG and CFM ratings.
  • Tank size: Most compressors have a tank to store compressed air, typically measured in gallons. While a larger tank means it can hold more air, it also takes up more space. Consider your needs and choose a size accordingly.

 

For more information about these and other metrics for evaluating an air compressor for home use, visit the Quincy Compressor Resources page.

Other Considerations

Numbers alone don’t tell the whole story when it comes to buying a compressor. Here are some other questions you should ask yourself while shopping around:

  • Single or two stage? A compressor’s “stages” refers to the number of cylinders in its pump. Single-stage compressors are simpler but better suited for intermittent, light- or medium-duty use. If you plan on using your machine for high-demand applications, such as auto repair, the best compressor for your home may be a two-stage unit.
  • Portable or stationary? Portable compressors can move from spot to spot. If you use your compressor for multiple purposes, portable may be best. If you require a heavier-duty machine and work primarily in one area, a stationary compressor is likely to offer better overall value.
  • Electric or gas? Gas compressors are generally more powerful. They do, however, require fuel and a ventilated area. Electric compressors cost less to run, but they may not deliver the power necessary for heavy-duty use.

 

Warranty Matters

Once you’ve determined the best type of compressor for your home, the challenge is then to choose a machine that will deliver on its promises and provide reliable performance for years to come. At Quincy Compressors, we stand behind all our products — both consumer and professional — with some of the best warranty coverage in the business. Visit individual product pages or contact a sales representative directly to learn more.

One of the most tedious yet still necessary components of the game of golf is regripping your clubs. It can be a time-consuming and frustrating task — and a messy one at that. Regular players should be in the habit of regripping their clubs at least once a year on average, perhaps more if you get lots of rounds in throughout the year.

The solvent and grip tape method is tried and true, but using an air compressor instead can be much more convenient. Here is a look at how to regrip your golf clubs using an air compressor.

 

regripping a golf club with an air compressor
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License

Here are some other tips to keep in mind when moving through the regripping process.

1. Make a Tape Decision

When regripping your clubs, there are three basic options for what to do with the grip tape that’s already on your clubs.

One option is to leave the existing tape on your clubs and reuse it. This is possible, but it’s probably the least desirable of the three options. After all, it’s likely the tape won’t form as strong a bond with the grip as it did the first time around.

Option two is to place new grip tape on top of existing tape. This will add an extra layer of tape, which can give some players a preferred feel. Of course, you can’t use this method forever — and some point out you’re going to need to peel back the layers of tape so your new grips fit.

The final and likely most common option is to remove your existing tape and replace it with new tape. Rather than solvent, try using a hair dryer or heat gun to soften the tape and make it easier to remove.

2. To Tape or Not to Tape?

When using an air compressor to slide your grips on your clubs, it’s possible to get away without using tape at all. Some players report their grips are secure and tight enough to go without double-sided tape or even masking tape.

Like many aspects of golf, it all comes down to personal preference and “feel.” Even though you can get away without using tape in the traditional sense, it can give players peace of mind to know their grip is securely bonded to the club.

On the other hand, if you don’t use tape, you run the risk of the grips slipping or sliding at an inopportune moment. As most golfers know, even a few millimeters of slippage can throw off your swing at any given time, most likely resulting in unwanted additional strokes.

Again, see what works for you.

3. Air Compressor Tips

If you’re new to regripping your clubs with an air compressor, be prepared for a bit of trial and error. But, before long, you’ll be regripping your clubs with ease.

Try adjusting the PSI on your air compressor to see what works best. Most tend to agree that 45 PSI is about right, but, again, check to see what is most comfortable for you. Once you’re set up, the grip should go on in just a few seconds with a few quick bursts from the air compressor.

As an added bonus, an air compressor can also be used to quickly and easily remove a grip as well. Simply shoot short bursts of air into the grip hole at the end, just as you did when you put the grip on. A few bursts of air along with some tugging and pulling should remove the grip quickly.

If you have not yet regripped your clubs this season, give the air compressor method a try. It’s less messy and should take a fraction of the time that the solvent and tape method takes. And, if you don’t feel satisfied with the results, there’s nothing stopping you from going back to your preferred method.

 

Portable Air Compressors

Posted on: December 11, 2020

Portable Air Compressors Quincy Compressor’s portable air compressors offer industry-leading power and efficiency in a small package. They are an excellent choice for home/DIY use, while still delivering the power and reliability necessary for commercial applications. Backed by an industry-leading extended warranty option, Quincy portable air compressors are built for the long haul, providing excellent […]

Read More

Understanding Air Compressor Specifications

Posted on: December 7, 2020

There are many essential factors to consider when selecting a compressor, including: The pounds per square inch gauge (PSIG) Cubic feet per minute (CFM) Horsepower Size of the tank The duty cycle The type of motor it uses Lubricated vs. oil-free systems Rotary screw vs. reciprocating/piston systems Air treatment options Required piping. You’ll also need to […]

Read More

What Does HP Mean for Air Compressors?

Posted on: December 7, 2020

Compressed air is vital to many operations both industrial and otherwise, so you want to make sure you buy a compressor with enough power to meet your needs. If you want to know what horsepower you should get for an air compressor that can handle all your applications, it helps to start with an understanding […]

Read More

Air Compressor Machine Prices: What You Need to Know

Posted on: December 7, 2020

Air compressors come in all different sizes and configurations to support a wide range of potential applications. You can find them everywhere from power and manufacturing plants to the garages of avid DIY enthusiasts. As a result, the cost of an air compressor can vary widely. Compressor machines may range from portable consumer units to large-scale […]

Read More

Now Offering NO-CONTACT SERVICE

Posted on: December 4, 2020

We understand many of our customers are following strict no-contact orders and opting to postpone needed compressed air services and planned maintenance. This could be very problematic—causing unexpected breakdowns, production loss or delay and unexpected costs. Quincy Compressor has a solution…We are now offering no-contact service! We will service your system while refraining from contact […]

Read More

Choosing the Best Air Compressor for Home Use

Posted on: December 4, 2020

If you’re serious about DIY — whether it’s carpentry, car repair or another pneumatic tool-driven hobby — you’ve likely considered buying your own air compressor at some point. A home air compressor can be a big investment. When considering your choices for an air compressor for home use, select wisely and find a manufacturer you can trust to […]

Read More

How to Regrip a Golf Club with an Air Compressor

Posted on: November 25, 2020

One of the most tedious yet still necessary components of the game of golf is regripping your clubs. It can be a time-consuming and frustrating task — and a messy one at that. Regular players should be in the habit of regripping their clubs at least once a year on average, perhaps more if you […]

Read More